The Symbols of the Greek Mythology

The Greek pantheon is one of the most studied religions of all times. Every Greek god and goddess has a set of his/her unique symbols that they can be identified with.

Greek mythology is filled with several legends and myths. According to mythology, fourteen Olympian deities ruled the world from Mount Olympus, which was their heavenly home. All goddesses were related to each other. The symbols and attributes had sacred status, which meant they could be worshiped in place of the gods.

The Minotaur

This was a creature that was part man and partly bulls. It stayed at the center of the Labyrinth, which was a maze-like structure. The Labyrinth was designed by a famous architect known as Daedalus and built on the orders of King Minos.

The Symbols of the Greek Mythology

The Labyrinth

It was built to hold the Minotaur. Daedalus had made it so cunningly, that it took him a while to leave after he finished constructing it.

The Symbols of the Greek Mythology

The Bowl of Hygeia

This symbol is recognized as an international symbol of pharmacy. In Greek mythology, Hygeia was the daughter and assistant of Aesculapius, who was the god of healing and medicine. The classic logo features a bowl containing a medicinal potion with the serpent of wisdom guarding it.

The Symbols of the Greek Mythology

The Gorgon

In Greek mythology, the Gorgon is a terrible, loud-roaring female monster with sharp fangs. Her power was mighty, such that anyone that tried looking at her would turn into stone. Therefore, the symbol would be placed on items that require protection like wine, kraters, and temples.

The Symbols of the Greek Mythology

The Mano Fico

It is also known as the Figa, and it means “hand fig.” The Mano Fico has the idiomatic slang connotation of a woman’s genitals. The symbol shows a hand where the thumb has been thrust between the middle and curled index, which is an imitation of heterosexual intercourse.

The Symbols of the Greek Mythology

The Omphalos

The Omphalos is an antique stone artifact. In Greek, Omphalos means “navel.” It is believed that Zeus sent out two eagles to fly across the world and meet at its center. Omphalos stones used to denote this point were erected in many areas surrounding the Mediterranean Sea.

The Symbols of the Greek Mythology